Peterborough to Build Part of the Parkway by August, 2011

My hometown of Peterborough, Ontario has approved a plan to build a chunk of the proposed Parkway expansion (a plan set on hold since the 1950’s, with a referendum held in 2003), between Sherbrooke and Parkhill Rd. It was OK’ed by a 9 to 2 vote by our city counsellors and will go into action next summer, finishing in August, 2011. Luckily, this road will stop short of Jackson Park, one of Peterborough’s largest and highly valued piece of green space.

The Peterborough Examiner almost jokingly wrote that the town hall meeting spent fifteen minutes disucssing this plan (valued at over $8.5 million in taxpayers money) while discussion of the future of the lawn bowling club took four hours.

Following the maps supplied by beyondtheparkway.org, we can see exactly where this road will be paved,

And overlayed with Google Maps, the road may look like this,

I’m not entirely sure of the environmental impact, but this showcases some of the plant life in the area. An effected citizen at the town hall meeting did raise her voice with concerns of disrupting bird migration in regards to the timing of the construction. Also, the road, will pave over the walkway besides St. Peter’s High School and create and traffic and noise in the backyards of hundreds of residences.

  • Ckylie

    If the city planning is so top notch why were residential area especially high rise buildings occupying hundreds of lower income families allowed with city zoning plans. If this is a 50 year old plan why have the city planners not put the parkway into consideration when zoning was issued for residential areas. If you said extremely poor planning you are right, but who will step up to the plate for the housing along the parkway -noise pollution and traffic. The city will be creating gettos and the public will have to pay for it. The people making these decisions need to be accountable for their actions let us hope Daryl Bennett business sense feels the same way and fights for his public rights and makes city planning accountable for their actions.

    CWhite

    • Harry Callihan

      Because they’re just not bright enough seems to be the right answer.